Technology, Time Management, Video Games

Technology & Gaming Management for Students

Melanie Hempe, RN and Andrew Doan, MD, PhD discuss these articles:

1) Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers.

2) LA officials seek fix to $1B program after students crack iPad security, access video games.

3) Gamer Addiction: A Threat To Student Success! What Advisors Need To Know.

Has one comment to “Technology & Gaming Management for Students”

You can leave a reply or Trackback this post.
  1. I concur with Dennis and Scott that adtidcion is a chronic condition. Assuming I worked at a public treatment center there are several things I would do to further the work of aligning this belief to what is actually practiced in our profession. Direct work with clients and families would include the education piece about how adtidcion is like having cancer, not like having a really bad case of the measles. Framing the issue of chronic vs. acute this way is crucial to helping all involved take the long view of success. Group work with a mixed-stage set of clients over an extended number of sessions as in Weegmann and English, skyped or cell phone based assertive continuing care, in-person quarterly RMC’s, would all be woven into my practice (assuming my agency was supportive). Much systemic work is needed to spread this vital reframing of adtidcion as a chronic condition. From an education standpoint, this concept and practice is not a hard shift to sell, but many of these shifts will cost money. When it comes down to dollars that is a different story. From all levels within the agency, to community, state and federal funding sources both education and advocacy is necessary. I am ready to sign up for the sustained push that is required for progress to be made. Taking these sytemic changes even further into the very critical need for overall change in our nation’s adtidcion treatment and aftercare structure. Toward that end I agree with McClellan and Meyers and say increases in funding support are needed to implement best practices in treating adults, adolescents, those who are dually diagnosed and incarcerated.

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published.